Fork me on GitHub
  1. About Java...

    Java is the COBOL of today.

    It is a language often used in education (fortunately nowadays Python is taking over there), but this just means that we have lots of “Java Programmers” with zero experience. And the only thing worse than a bad programmer is a bad programmer who thinks …

    Read more...


  2. Error Handling in Shell Scripts

    Once thing new shell programmers struggle with is error handling. The shell does not use exceptions like the programming languages most developers are familiar with; basically the shell mostly pre-dates the notion of exceptions in higher-level programming languages.

    Developers often conceptualise shell commands to be something similar to procedures: You …

    Read more...


  3. Naming Shell Scripts

    You're writing a shell script to do... something. Whatever it is, it will hopefully make your life easier in some way or other.

    But what do you call it?

    This touches on a pet peeve of mine. Whatever you do, do not call it somescript.sh. You should never use …

    Read more...


  4. Making SSH Easy

    SSH is great. But it does mean typing longer commands than you otherwise would have done.

    For example, if your local user name is joe but your user name on a remote server is jbloggs, then you have to specify the user name whenever you use SSH to communicate with …

    Read more...


  5. Using Bastion hosts with SSH

    Sometimes companies' security policies dictate the use of "bastion hosts": Hosts that you have to "jump through" to get to the network behind the host - i.e. you cannot connect directly to a host "behind" the bastion host.

    This does improve security a bit, but the most visible effect is …

    Read more...


  6. Christmas - the Danish way

    Although I live in the UK, I often get questions about what is different about Christmas the Danish way.

    Well - that deserved a blog post.

    First of all, Christmas in Danish is Jul - cognate to the old English word Yule - they're pronounced almost the same way.

    Keeping the pre-christian name …

    Read more...


Page 1 / 3 »